Mary Ingles Chapter

Fort Thomas, Kentucky

Sharon Anne Strnb Emerine, Regent

Debra Rigg, First Vice Regent

Esther Drewry, Second Vice Regent

Beth Healy & Jeanette Kremer, Co-Chaplains

Sharon Horan, Recording Secretary

Sue Huff, Corresponding Secretary

Betty Brockhoff, Treasurer

Julie Smith-Morrow, Registrar

 

 

Updated January 12, 2019

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HISTORY OF THE CHAPTER

 

The Mary Ingles Chapter was organized November 8, 1934 and confirmed as a chapter on December 19, 1934. The Organizing Regent was Minnie Marsh Wheat; other charter members were Carrie Peak Weakley, Sarah Tracy Bower, Lizabeth Dake Shepard, Harriet McCormick Parker, Elizabeth C. Weakley, Nelle Mershon Hill, Mary F. Conkwright Van Winkle, Alma Scrivener Bridges, Ethel Woodson Bell, Elizabeth Carlisle Haizlip, and Virginia Stein Youtsey.

 

The original members of the Mary Ingles chapter firmly believed in the mission of the NSDAR-promoting historic preservation, education, and patriotism. They adopted by-laws, established monthly programs, formed committees, and chose state convention representatives.

 

Today the Mary Ingles Chapter is an active, vibrant and growing organization with deep roots in the history of our country. Chapter members are a microcosm of American society at its best. We are volunteers who contribute thousands of hours and dollars to support our communities, our veterans and our wounded warriors. We include doctors, teachers, and business owners; we are mothers, grandmothers, daughters and sisters.  We are proud to take our name from Mary Draper Ingles, the wife of William Ingles of Augusta County, Virginia. In1775, as a young mother, Mary was kidnapped when a Shawnee war party attacked the hamlet of Draper’s Meadows. Separated from her children who were taken with her, Mary was forced to go to Big Bone Lick, Kentucky, to get salt. She eventually escaped and traveled by foot for 43 days, covering 700 miles of wilderness. She was reunited with her husband and lived until she was eighty-three.