Poage Chapter

Madisonville, Kentucky

Amanda Tilsley, Regent

Cheryl Spriggs, Vice Regent

Cindy Black, Chaplain

Louise Elizabeth Taylor, Recording Secretary

Lynda Cannon, Corresponding Secretary

Beverly Evans, Treasurer

Judy Carter, Registrar

Judith Fleming, Historian

Margaret Burns, Librarian

 

 

Updated January 12, 2019

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HISTORY OF THE CHAPTER

 

The following article about Poage Chapter was taken from Ashland Daily Independent,

published Sunday, October 30, 1949

Transcribed by: Judy Cantrell Fleming

 

"Poage Chapter was organized in October 1909. On that historical occasion, seventeen women banded themselves together for organization, and formed the nucleus of the outstanding Poage Chapter that it is today.

 

"Members who formed the organizing group were Mrs. Catherine Poage Townsend, organizing regent; Miss Margaret Annie Poage, Miss Laurence Louise Poage, Mrs. Virginia Poage Henderson, Mrs. Nettie Poage Duesler, Mrs. Ann E. Poage, Miss Harriet Poage, Miss Louella Kemper Poage, Mrs. Viola Gartrell Houston, Mrs. Virginia Gartrell Cherrington, Mrs. Rebecca Poage Buckler, Mrs. Glen Margaret Poage Crawford, Mrs. Judith Poage Vaugh, Mrs. Mary Pollard Culbertson, Maude Crowell King, Mrs. Catherine Crowell Kitchen, Mrs. Eliza Isabelle Means Seaton.

 

"The name Poage was chosen in honor of General John Poage from whom fourteen of the seventeen members were lineally descended. He and his brother Col. George Poage were Revolutionary soldiers at the Battles of Point Pleasant and the siege of Yorktown. Poageļæ½s Landing, the settlement here which ante-dated the settlement of Ashland, was so named in honor of these distinguished gentlemen who had pioneered their way into this section from their ancestral Virginia homes.

 

"They came near the end of the Eighteenth Century. They built a sturdy brick house near the Ohio River bank near (sic) the Ashland Airport. This old Poage house was one of the first brick houses west of the Alleghenies. The bricks were brought by flatboats from Vanceburg. The plaster was made of mussel shells ground by oxen.

 

"The above occurred some fifty years before the incorporation of Ashland as a town. Ashland was actively incorporated March 8, 1854, with the stockholders meeting, and electing officers in the following April. The town was surveyed and lots were laid out by Mr. M. T. Hilton and the first sale of lots occurred in June 1854.

 

"The first baby born in Ashland was Ashland Poage, born June 16, 1854, at 1016 Winchester Avenue.

 

"Miss Louella Kemper Poage, a sister of Ashland Poage, was one of the charter members of Poage Chapter D. A. R.

 

"The Poages were people of Presbyterian faith, and their names frequent the annals of the early Presbyterian Church in this vicinity. They were substantial citizens all, and were actively affiliated with many early business enterprises in this section.

 

"Of the three charter member(sic) of Poage Chapter who did not have Poage ancestry, Mrs. Seaton was descended from Olive Hildreth of Massachusetts; Mrs. Kitchen and Mrs. King were descended from Aaron Crowell of New Jersey."